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penceble to preserve it. this approach was dictated in lincoln's mind by two assumptions. first lincoln assume that the national government must at all costs remain support of the four slave states within the union. those in light blue. so called loyal border states, delaware, missouri, maryland and especially kentucky top do that, he believed, the republicans must not an antagonize those states politically powerful slave holders. antagonize them by interfering with slavery in the succeeding states at least not interfering with them anymore than necessary. lincoln was sure that if he did otherwise the slave holders would pick up and leave as well. second lincoln assumes that only a small minority in the succeeding states really support succession. he and other republicans believe that the great majority of white southerners in the confederacy. slave holders and nonslave holders alike. loyal abiding citizens who had been tricked in to suck us is suggestion by a minority of extremists. leaving slavery alone would hopefully, win them back in to the union. that is the expectations. but afte
on the first lady's. the body of knowledge on lincoln pretty much everything that could be written probably has been. the greatest historian says been years poring through the letters and the evidence to produce this book on lincoln of this book and the hundreds of books on washington. so my problem is, why not look at the person that new them the best, the first lady because historians have largely ignored the role of the first lady as the largely ignored the mistresses and shipping the man. tend to be older man, educated in a certain way. most historians, as i always say, were not educated in matters of the heart. studying the first lady, the first thing thomas jefferson did after spending 17 days cooped up in of lost outside a philadelphia writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did is he went shopping for market, his wife. he mr. she was pregnant. she had had a miscarriage. he bought her some gloves. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so he could go home to be with his wife. every winter of the revolutionary war. suffering through the freezing wea
laying his left hand on two bibles -- one owned by abraham lincoln and the other owned by dr. martin luther king, jr. afterward, obama will deliver a speech laying out his plans for the next four years. the nro ceremony will include music from singers james taylor, beyoncÉ, and others which will carry live during our extended five-our inauguration special. after our regular broadcast ends, we will continue to bring you coverage until 1:00 p.m. eastern standard time, including the swearing in ceremony. some stations will run the whole five our special, for others you can go to democracynow.org. this year, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political p
. >> when lincoln was debatings baiting about the future of the country, lincoln studied the deck la ragsz of independence. lincoln with his thinking about america on the declaration of ind pen accidence. not yes on the constitution, but more fundamentally on the declaration. it's obviously what the civil war was about. this was lincolnesque in the sense that he was applying -- barack obama was applying the thinking about the unity of the country in the dignity of all men and women to the problems he faced today in saying there's a role for the union, if you will. don't forget, lincoln talked about the union, there's a role for the union, there's a role for all of us, together, to solve the problems that we all face. and that was the lincoln part of it. this came, and there's a big conflicting. we the people believe that ea enduring security do not require through perpetual war. who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends. and we must carry these lessons into this time as well. i think he's talking about iran. the one war that you face within the next few moblts. . >> you may very
king jr., and another bible, the one belonging to president lincoln. and then later on, as the parade was about to begin, the first family, a modern scene here. dad on his blackberry, the girls snapping pictures on their iphones. all day long, abc's david muir has been following this, he was there at the capitol watching history on parade this morning. we begin you with, david. >> reporter: diane, good evening. you're right. we were just a few steps away from the president, with his hand placed on those two bibles. authorities here in washington were estimating 600,000 to 800,000 people would turn out to the national mall to watch this swearing in. but tonight, we just learned from the inaugural committee, just like four years ago, that crowd might have surpassed a million. at the white house, a salute to the president, who was about to be sworn in before the nation. first, that 1.7-mile trip to the capitol. ahead of the president, on the west front of the capitol, a former president and the secretary of state. cheers on the national mall for the clintons, mrs. clinton looking better
: and abraham lincoln's, delivered to a nation divided by civil war. >> with malice toward none, with charity for all. >> reporter: a third theme, renewing our commitment to the values of our founding fathers. perhaps it's surprising the president found inspiration in the words of this former a adversa adversary. >> there can be no human rights without human liberty. >> reporter: aides tell us that, although the president disagrees with mr. bush's policy, he's moved by the speech's democratic principles. >> freedom by its nature must be chosen and defended by citizens. >> reporter: a message, aides say, the president will echo today, as he did at the white house last week. >> that most fundamental set of rights, to life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness. those rights are at stake. we're responsible. >> reporter: of all his predecessors, the president says he is most inspired by president lincoln. >> that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth. >> reporter: in november, mr. obama screened steven spielberg's movie "lincoln" at the white ho
's not unprecedented. three presidents in the past have done the same. the first belonged to president lincoln. he used it in his swearing-in in 1861. and the second belonged to martin luther king jr. it was his traveling bible and it's fitting because today is martin luther king day. after the swearing-in, the president and the first lady family and friends, congressional leaders all head in to statuary hall for lunch. this is a tradition that dates back to 1889. they'll dine on bison and good old-fashioned apple pie. >> we go to chief correspondent and host of "face the nation" bob schieffer. he's covering his 12th inaugurations. good morning. >> actually it's 13. i came to lbj's with my mom. she got an invitation. the first one i covered, you're absolutely right, was 1968. and hearing robert gibbs talk about he will stress togetherness and trying to you know, heal this partisan divide it made me think of theodore roosevelt in his inaugural speech. he said at one point our relations with other powers are important, he said, but even more important are our relations among o
and the -- in the atrocity of abortion and it should be as important as, you know, slavery was back in lincoln's time. it's the right of everyone to have life and liberty and these unborn babies across the country are being killed and we have a pro-life charity, saveunbornlives.org and we're trying to call to attention to look at these innocent little ones and offer hope to a abortion-mined women to choose life. i hope you get someone to speak on this issue because over 50% are pro life americans now and that should be the number one topic we should be talking about a personhood amendment just like lincoln talked about freing the slaves in his amendment. host: we'll be talking about the ageneral ka for the second term coming up in our last half of "the washington journal" this morning and we'll talk about, could there be another contraception fight like there was during the first term but you mentioned roe v. wade. that's the front page of the "washington times" this morning, abortion battle rages 40 years of row decision. protest planned in washington. more than one million abortions are performed each
. when lincoln creates lincoln is a talking about secession. he said you are sugarcoating the picture of this country. the printers that we cannot put this in the official record. and he said i can't imagine no american not knowing what sugarcoating men's. this goes back to william safire's influence. one of the first uses of cool, not in a sense the sense of temperature but in the sense of being callous, he said that was a behavioral thing. those are words, words like cool. obama could come up with a new meaning for it as well. he could take his own word and given a new meaning. how either this was i did a lot of reading and i did a lot of use of huge proprietary databases that the libraries tab. nineteenth century databases where we can actually find the original document in which jefferson writes to the danbury caucus and comes up with a phrase of separation of church and state, which is not in the constitution. in fact it was first articulated in this letter by jefferson. so there were these big huge data proprietary bases where there is about every word and phrase. mckinley came
discrimination a crime. it was a very, very -- probably the most important advance since lincoln signed the emancipation proclaimation, and during that year, if johnson was mr. inside, and some outside, because he gave some inspirational speeches -- king kept the pressure on. whenever he thought that the congress was going to falter, that they couldn't beat a southern filibuster, king went to jail, and he refused to let people forget what this was all about. i'd like to concentrate on one particular period, because we have an anniversary coming up today, and i think looking at johnson and king during the struggle over the voting rights act in 1965, illustrates as well as anything the brilliance of both these men, the difficulty of their task, and their multidimensional leadership. the most important aspect of -- one of the most important aspects of which was the uncanny ability of both johnson and king to seize opportunity. they knew when to strike. on january 15, 1965, president johnson called martin luther king to congratulate him on his 36th birthday. listen to a little bit of what t
and continue to move ahead with courage really influenced her. then she went on to a school called lincoln school that produced a lot of socially active leaders in our nation. missionaries came and educated children to become more socially minded, to think about the world they lived in. that began the early activism inherent piqued her interest in why am i here and what is my purpose? from that point down she was purpose-driven in by the time she got to antioch she became involved in the naacp the progressive political party in the peace movement. she was involved in the police movement well in advance of daddy speaking out on the war in vietnam. >> host: this public image of your mother is behind-the-scenes, quiet. >> she was a quiet storm. [laughter] >> host: what was she like as a person? >> guest: she was very issue driven. she had a gentle spirit and the thing that i like to say about her the most is she exuded the unconditional love of god like nobody ever knew. i didn't know my father's will because i was only five when he was assassinated. she satel mail the time i don't hold grudg
are following a lincoln town car they thought that was suspicious. they stopped the car. one thing leads to another. a couple gang bangers in the car. lo and behold, the gun gets c's, a glock nine-millimeter pistol. because of the good process is still in place, that gun goes right to the illinois timeout, testfired and the test fires search through the database and this time there is a hit, a match. now police now attack nics from from that lincoln town car ways that gun used to kill bloomberg eight years before. the problem is that the people driving that car in possession of that gun eight years before were probably 10 or 11 years old they couldn't reach the pedals of that lincoln town car. frankly i have a problem reaching the pedals on a lincoln town car myself. but what's happened here is police depended on information and data available to them from the inside of the gun, the ballistics data to determine what crime that gun was used to commit. but now they were stymied. so what do they do? they turned to the outside of the gun. they made models hillier number, nomenclature, descri
and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and looked, that was astounding. 23 seconds he stood there and he gazed out at the national mall to let it sink in. it must have been an extraordinary day for him. what does today hold for him after that full night of dancing he had? >> reporter: he heads to the national cathedral. the day after inauguration, the presidents always get a chance to go sit down at an interfaith service, a prayer and prayers are given not only for the president but also the vice president for their second terms. this is historic event that d
honoring king and his favorite president abraham lincoln. >> fate of human dignity in our hands, now, now, now. >> reporter: mr. obama will place his hand on two bibles, one that king used, one that lincoln used. ♪ then it's the parade. the route has been secured. the floats are ready to roll down pennsylvania avenue ♪ this girl is on fire >> reporter: while there will only be two inaugural balls they are star studded. alich gentleman keyes, brad paisley and jennifer hudson. ♪ but you never -- >> before all the pomp and parties, the president took part again in what he calls the national day of service. >> this inauguration should also be an affirmation that we're all in this together. >> reporter: so the first family grabbed paint brushes at a local elementary school. already the people's lawn is seeing plenty of visitors. >> we love president obama. whoo! >> reporter: i got to tell you there were a lot of phobes out last night already having a good time. they've got a couple more nights to go here in washington waugh. the official ceremony is actually starting in just another hour
in today, along with a bible that belongsed to abraham lincoln. tell me about your father's bible. >> that bible is at least 59 years of age, because in it are markings. such as 5-10-54. he was using this as a bible to meditate and pray and prepare himself for leadership in the church. very tattered. we did a little repairing on it, restoration, so it wouldn't fall apart when the president places his hand on it. >> that would be a bad thing to happen in the middle of the inauguration ceremony. i know you are preparing to speak at ebenezer church today, because, of course, what a great coincidence of timing, today we also celebrate your father's legacy as well, on the same day we inaugurate a president. what will you talk about? how do the two things intersect for you? >> first and foremost, the fact that the president is using daddy's bible is heart warming for me. my father was first and foremost a preacher, pastor, it reminds people of that. that is one of the things i will stress today. we must remember the pastor and preacher, and my father was such a healing lead eer, and so
much in the tradition of king and of lincoln and he has rallied his base. we'll be talking in the next few days about all the negatives and the negative reviews are coming in. today is the day for president obama. this is a day when he really defined what he believes fundamentally. >> david, do you think this is, someone said this is a speech he wished he could have given four years ago but wasn't able to. how did he seem to you? >> i thought it was a marvelous speech and it is brave and it is bold and i think it will play well in history. not enough people are talking about the climate change. there was a healthy paragraph in there about that. 30, 40 years ago, the fact that he took an inaugural speech and used that kind of time and talked about climate is important and just making seneca and selma and stonewall. it will be repeated over and over again as part of the traditions of american rights and civil rights. >> that was really something. to hear him smeng stonewall in the first statements, certainly for gay and lesbian americans, that was a stunning leap forward. >> gigantic. he
ceremony on martin luther king employing bibles by martin luther king and president lincoln. an address down the mall toward lincoln's memorial where dr. king gave his most famous speech. to spell out the country his vision for the next four years. it is america's quadrennial celebration of the office of the presidency, the orderly transition of power, the luminaries, the singers, the salutes, the speech, the pomp, the circumstance, the second inauguration of president barack obama starts right now. >>> welcome to washington. it is chilly but frankly bearable outside as the country prepares to celebrate the peaceful maintenance of power, the transferns of power from the first term administration of president barack obama to his second term administration. the president was officially sworn in by chief justice john roberts yesterday at the blue room at the white house as the first lady and the obama daughters looked on. but in the little less than two hours the president will affirm that oath before a much larger crowd with 100% more pomp and an equal proportion of circumstance. we have
complex. >> he continued for a cause he knew was right. that's the lesson of lincoln, of dr. king and president obama. dr. reverend walker who chaired dr. king used to always remind me of his favorite kwoet from dr. king. he would say you measure not a man by the way he is stands in time of convenience, but where he stands in the times of controversy. the president, now dr. king and even lincoln before. they stood in the most controversial and perilous times. people that show leadership and stability and vision and commitment when it's the most difficult of times. any one can shine when everything is going well. but it's when it is the darkest that we can see those that really bear the brightest lights. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >> hey, lance, tell us something we don't know. let's play "hardball. "hardbal. >> good evening. let's start with this. lance slide. it's not like we didn't see this coming for a long time. extra power or linebacker hoping for some extra muscle. no, lance armstrong was an international hero. a seven time-tour de fra
the country -- you know, when he talked to you, he mentioned lincoln's quote. there's a second sentence to lincoln's quote. the first is without public opinion, nothing can happen. with it, everything. then he said, sentiment goes deeper than he who makes laws. i think the second term what he understand from the first term is he was inside washington too much. you have to use the bully pulpit. you have to get out among the people. you have to mobilize. he has a base out there, a coalition that voted for him, pretty actively came to the polls. and the best presidents have been able to mobilize pressure from the outside in. and what four years has told him, maybe he's tried to get republicans over. some of them don't come. he should keep trying. and he has to really keep trying with the democrats. i agree. those are the ones he should schmooze. whatever that word is. >> don't pretend you don't know it. >> richard, i want to pick up on that point. >> although that sounds very good, of course there is the world that comes knocking. and the world is going to come knocking a lot. >> we'll tal
]. >> this was not lincoln, although lincoln's second inaugural is referenced early on in the speech. that was in the middle of the civil war when lincoln gave that. this is not f.d.r., we have nothing to fear but fear itself, in the middle of the gr"great depression." a speech on social justice and injecting into the main fabric of american history and seneca falls and what that meant in 1948, civil rights movement and equality and inject seneca falls and mentioned women about three different times, mentioned stonewall, which when i went to graduate school here at georgetown, stonewall was considered lefty history not in the main fabric of the mainstream books, he threw stonewall in there as if it was a military battle site. and then selma. i thought that made it a historic speech. i can see why the republicans aren't that happy with it. it did seem to be a speech that appealed to the base largely. those reasons and then finally climate, joe, the president not talking about climate in '12, in debates climate didn't come up. the journalist never asked one climate question. i think 50 years from now, climate
just jacksons. you can get washingtons and lincolns, too. >>> good morning. i'm john muller, in for rob nelson. >> and i'm paula faris. in his much-anticipated interview with oprah winfrey, lance armstrong called himself a flawed character. he also said he deserves condemnation after more than a decade of lying about using performance-enhancing drugs. >> as neal karlinsky reports, armstrong described cheating as part of his job. >> reporter: even though we knew it was coming, hearing lance armstrong saying it out loud was surreal. >> did you ever blood dope or use blood transfusions to enhance your cycling performance? >> yes. >> in all seven of your tour de france victories, did you ever take banned substances or blood dope? >> yes. >> reporter: so, why admit it now? armstrong blamed the momentum of his own story. >> this is too late. it's too late for probably most people. and that's my fault. you know, i've used this situation as one, big l repeated a lot of times. >> lance armstrong just confirmed he's tour de france win. >> reporter: the icon who transcended sports, hung around wit
with his eloquence. and then, beyond the reflecting pool, the dignified columns of the lincoln memorial. whoever would understand in his heart the meaning of america will find it in the life of abraham lincoln. beyond those monuments to heroism is the potomac river, and on the far shore the sloping hills of arlington national cemetery, with its row upon row of simple white markers bearing crosses or stars of david. they add up to only a tiny fraction of the price that has been paid for our freedom. each one of those markers is a monument to the kind of hero i spoke of earlier. their lives ended in places called belleau wood, the argonne, omaha beach, salerno, and halfway around the world on guadalcanal, tarawa, pork chop hill, the chosin reservoir, and in a hundred rice paddies and jungles of a place called vietnam. under one such marker lies a young man, martin treptow, who left his job in a small town barbershop in 1917 to go to france with the famed rainbow division. there, on the western front, he was killed trying to carry a message between battalions under heavy artillery fire. we
in history's rear view mirror. >> washington, lincoln. reporter: every historian has a list of favorites. >> they had courage. and they had integrity. >> reporter: the presidents who were our greatest leaders and why. later on sunday morning. >> osgood: a presidential limosine it is not but a brand new version of a much belovedded sports car promised fast company for those with a taste of style and speed. lee cowan will be taking us for a test drive. >> reporter: some are describing chevy's new corvette as pure sex. the new sting ray is sleeker faster and has lines that have some already lining up to get one. >> you're the first outside person. >> am i really? to sit in one of these. reporter: the latest generation of an american icon later on sunday morning. >> osgood: warren buffet is something of an american icon himself. multibillionaire who lives unpretentiously a long way from wall street. this morning rebecca jarvis will visit the age of omaha. >> must have been thinking about investments at the time. >> reporter: with a net worth of some $46 billion warren buffet is
him from a distance. i try tried to get as close as i could so i got to the foot of the lincoln memorial but the notion of this 19-year-old that i would actually shake hands with him, that would have been the thrill of my life. i only saw his. >> twice and both times i saw as a member of the crowd. he came to ucla when i was a student there and spoke so that was the other time in 1965, something like that. >> host: how did that impact you on the way home? you have this long journey on the way home. >> guest: i didn't have a right back. i didn't tell my parents i was coming and i had a bus ticket that only went back to indianapolis. so then i just had to hitchhike and i hitchhiked across the country. >> host: were you scared? >> guest: of course i was but his 19-year-old you can do anything. >> host: you think you're invincible. how did that speech that day impact you on how stokely was trying to influence you? you talk to stokely afterwards. >> guest: well know, before. not afterwards. probably three years before i talk to him and by that time he had become -- in 1963 he was not
of the lincoln memorial but the notion as a 19-year-old that i would even shake hands with him, that could have been the thrill of my life. i saw him speak twice and both times i saw him as a member of the crowd. it was the other time maybe 1965, something like that. >> host: how did that impact you on the way home? >> guest: i didn't tell my parents i was coming and i have a bus tickets that went back to indianapolis so then i just had to hitchhike and i just hiked across the country. >> host: were you scared? >> guest: as the 19-year-old you think that you can do anything. >> host: how the hearing dr. king's speech that the impact you on how stokely was trying to influence you? because you talk to him after. >> guest: before, not after. it was probably three years before i talked to him again. by that time he had become -- in 1963 he wasn't a well-known figure. 1966 he had black power so that is the next time we got back in touch with each other again and from that point on i stay in touch with him for the rest of his life. >> host: we are going to talk about him more because stokely carmicha
for the president and i even have a prayer that as he and others handle the lincoln bible and the king bible, that the bible won't just be a ceremonial piece, but it will be so compelling that they'll be moved not only to read some of it, but to do it. and yet, we're talking now about gun control, and not taking up that weapon of love, that weapon that never fails. and we are want to go control the guns and take the guns away, but allow others to use them with certain restrictions and no restrictions, but forgetting that message of the love, and that's one of the points and yet we'll realized the killing of a certain people group in america and that's the little babies in the womb of course, and still, you want to take away the guns, but you're not going to control the abortion industry. so, there are some discrepancies between the message of the current administration and the whole nation and the whole world today, and those messages that are timeless from martin luther king, jr., and it it boils down, governor, to love for our neighbors and ourselves. >> mike: you've pointed out roe versus
. the land of lincoln float features american flags, the state flag, and a panorama of the capitol. the state seal adorns the front of the float. the float is approximately 20 feet long, 8 feet wide -- >> the south shore drill team from chicago. the president's hometown. the first lady's hometown. they've come here. two major gifts allowed them to come here. from walgreens. they raised the money. they are here. attending this inauguration. you can see the president, he's pretty excited to see what's going on. >> special because they were unable to attend the first inauguration because of lack of funds. so this is very special for them this time. >> they're going right in front of the reviewing stand right now. you see the president and the first lady. the vice president. >> there's a huge set of speakers heading our way. we'll see that right behind them. >> they're moving. >> here we go, here we go. >> the president's moving too. >> how can you not? >> that's right. ♪ >> the south shore drill team from chicago, illinois. ♪ ♪ >> the gullahgeecheee is representing the culture of the islan
"lincoln." >> state dinners. >> the majority leader's office called later and said, yeah, we got the invitation that afternoon, four hours beforehand. but you invite congressmen and senators over, one on one, they'll come. >> there is an upside to cooperation. not every battle is one of opposition. begin to reframe the image of the party with the rest of the country, number one. at the end of the day, that's what people want to see, you working with the administration. to joe's point, you don't have to agree with everything, but you can at least stand there and show that we're trying to make the effort. so when you have the noise come out about, well, we want to block him at every turn, that plays on the psyche of the american people. >> mike, what'ses in it f in it republicans? well, the republicans' backs are against the wall. they owned the house of representatives. they have a midterm election in 2014. for those republicans saying, oh, well, we always win midterm electio elections, no, you don't. two elections ago, we get routed by nancy pelosi. >> let's get to a break. we ha
to president lincoln which the president used four years ago when he was sworn in. but he'll also be bringing a bible that belonged to the rev. martin luther king jr that's fitting because the ceremony takes place on martin luther king jr.'s day. the president will be surrounded by his family and his friends. some of the best seats in the house will go to invited guests of the president. the supreme court justices, the joint chiefs of staff. congressional leaders. and i'll tell you who else has a great seat tomorrow, scott. that's the brooklyn tabernacle choir. you'll see them up in those bleachers just above where the swearing-in is taking place. they're up there right now because they rehearsed earlier today. now they're just taking in the great view watching james taylor rehearse who was out here just a few minutes ago and sounded wonderful. he's singing "america the beautiful." scott >> pelley: nancy, thank you very much. as we prepare to say good-bye to you this morning let's have one more look at the swearing-in of the president in the blue room of the white house that took place just m
, with his being recognized through me and i am so thankful for that. >> the president will use lincoln's bible and the bible of dr. king as well on inauguration ceremony. and i always think of that as sort of, a cycle, right, in a way, a virtuous cycle, martin luther king jr., assassinated trying to create what i think to some may be small degree, has been realized in the election and inauguration the first black president of this country. >> well, you know, with the first election, i along with so many other people just broke down and cried and cried and cried. out of thankfulness, out of remembering what we had been through. and thinking about medgar and all those other people who gave their lives and gave so much that we don't even recognize any more. and hopefully, will begin to do that in the very, very near future. >> myrlie evers-williams, we're looking forward to your three minutes, we can't wait. >> so am i. >> so great to see you. >>> so a man who marched alongside martin luther king jr. during the civil rights era, congressman john lewis, he will be here, we will speak to hi
recently no elected republicans elected a white house screening of "lincoln" last month. had mitch mcconnell, john boehner, lamar alexander attended, they were all invited, they would have joined not only nancy pelosi, harry reid but steven spielberg, tommy lee jones. as tip o'neill famously said about his political foe, ronald reagan, love the sinner. hate the sin. when president reagan would invite the speaker, tip o'neill over to the white house for drinks and raise a glass to one another. there's no shortage of parties planned around inauguration 2013. here is h
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)

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